4 Trees That Can Survive The Michigan Winter

Landscaping and gardening can be pretty tricky jobs. This does not only require the careful selection of which trees and shrubs can grow effectively within your area but as well as how you would maintain and keep them alive during different harsh seasons. It is best to consider the survival factors as well when deciding which tree to plant since all trees and shrubs have different care requirements.

Naturally, when choosing which tree to plant, it is best to choose one that suits your location. There could be uninterrupted sun areas, soil that is sand, loam, or clay, and different soil drain qualities. When carefully deciding on what to plant, be sure to do lots of research about your location. There are Michigan soil tests that would provide you information about soil type, pH, organic matter percentage, and fertilizer recommendations.

Native trees and shrubs are always the best options and have the best benefit within their respective locations. These trees have been proven to successfully survive in the location’s area for thousands of years. This means that are likely less prone to native conditions, insects, and diseases. 

Maples (Acer spp.)

Maples (Acer spp.)

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Maple trees are common deciduous trees that can be found in Michigan. Some of the most common native Maple species that can be found in Michigan are the sugar maple, the silver maple, and the red maple. Out of the three, silver maples are said to have the weakest wood. These maples do provide plenty of shade with their large leaves which can be a great addition to your yard. 

These Maple trees grow well in hardiness zones 3 through 9, except for sugar maples that perform better in hardiness zones 3 to 8, and full sun or part shade. They could also grow 20 feet tall to 50 feet or more with a crown spread of up to 50 feet wide.

Oaks (Quercus)

Oaks (Quercus)

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Another deciduous tree is the oak tree. Some of the common species of oaks in Michigan are Red oak, bur oak, swamp white oak, Pin oaks, black oaks, and white oaks. Out of all these, Red oak, bur oak, and swamp white oak are said to be easier to plant since it will grow even in poorly drained areas. 

Oak trees are also known by the name mighty oaks since they tolerate many different conditions and would even grow in a rounded and densely leaved shape. These oak trees are known to be able to grow at least 20 feet tall or more. Although these trees may fare well and perform better in sunny areas, it can also tolerate part shade and are hardy in zones 3 through 8.

Eastern Redcedar (Juniperus virginiana)

Eastern Redcedar (Juniperus virginiana)

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These are evergreen trees that are sized small to medium with deeply-grounded roots and are wind- and drought-resistant. There are some varieties of Juniperus trees that are cold-hardy, which have gray-green, needle foliage. The foliage would also usually turn bronze in the winter. These trees are moderate to long-lived evergreen where some specimens were even known to live more than 500 years. 

Eastern White Pine (Pinus Strobis)

Eastern White Pine (Pinus Strobis)

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State tree of Michigan with long, soft needles in groups of fives. A moderately fast-growing, large tree, vigorous as an ornamental tree and requires well-drained soils. In fact, The Native American Haudenosaunee denominated it the “Tree of Peace”.

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